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20120928
20121006
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 179 (some duplicates have been removed)
in advance, will be three on the economy and one each on health care, the role of government and governing, with an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics and choices. both candidates will also have two-minute closing statements. the audience here in the hall is promised to remain silent. no cheers, applause, boos, hisses, among other noisy, distracting things, so we may all concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception right now, though, as we welcome president obama... and governor romney. [cheers and applause] >> reporter: gentlemen, welcome to you both. let's start with the economy. segment one. and let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about how you would go about creating new jobs. each of you have two minutes to start. a coin toss has determined, mr. president, gufirst. >> thank you very much, jim, for this opportunity. i want to thank governor romney and the university of denver for your hospitality. there are a lot of points i want to make tonight, but the most important one is that 20 years ago, i became t
care for our own poor in more effective ways than having the federal government tell us how to care for our poor." one of the magnificent things about this country is the idea that states are the laboratories of democracy. do not let the government telling states what kind of training and medicare they have to have. if the state gets in trouble, we can step in to help them. the right approach is one that relies on the brilliance of our people and states, not the federal government. >> we are still on the economy but another part of it. this is segment 3, the economy -- entitlements. the first question goes to you, mr. president. do you see a major difference between the two of you on it? -- on social security? >> we have a somewhat similar position. it is socially sound. it will have to be tweaked. the basic structure is sound. i want to talk about the values behind social security and medicare. medicare is the big driver of our deficit. my grandmother helped to raise me. my grandfather died a while back. my grandmother died three days before i was elected president. she was indepen
will be free on the economy and one each on health care, the role of garment, and governing. there will be an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics, and choices. both will have two-minute closing statements. the audience has promised to remain silent. no cheers, applause, or other noisy distracting things so we may concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception right now as we welcome president obama and governor romney. [applause] welcome to you both. let's start with the economy. segment one. let's begin with drops. what are -- let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about how you would go about creating new jobs? you have two minutes each to start. the coin toss has determined that mr. president goes first. >> thank you very much for this opportunity. thank you, governor romney, and the university of denver. 20 years ago i became the luckiest man on earth because michelle obama agreed to marry me. i want to wish you happy anniversary and let you know that a year from now we will not be celebrating it
or the candidates. the segments will be three on the economy and one each on health care the role of government, and governing. with an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics, and choices. both candidates will also have two-minute closing statements. the audience here in the hall has promised to remain silent. no cheers applause boos hiss among other noisy distracting things, so we may all concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception right now, though as we welcome president obama and governor romney. [ cheers and applause ] >> jim. >> gentlemen, welcome to you both. let's start the economy segment 1, and let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about creating new jobs? you have two minutes -- each of you have two minutes to start. a coin toss has been determined mr. president you go first. >> obama: thank you very much for this opportunity. i want to thank governor romney and the university of colorado for your hospitality. 20 years ago i became the luckiest man on earth because michelle obama agreed t
, the role of government, and government, with an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics, and choices. both candidates will also have two-minute closing statements. the audience here in the hall has promised to remain silent. no cheers, applause, boos, hisses, among other noisy distracting things, 0 -- so we may all concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception now, though, as we welcome president obama and governor romney. [cheers and applause] [applause] >> welcome to you both. let's start the economy. let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about how you would go about creating new jobs? >> thank you very much. i want to thank the university of denver for your hospitality. there are a lo of -- lot of points i want to make. the first point i would like to make, is 20 years ago, i became the luckyest man on earth because michelle obama married me. i just want you to know, next year we will not be celebrating it in front of 40 million people. four years ago we went through the worst financial crisis since the great depr
captioning sponsored by cbs >> i don't think government can solve all our problems but government's not the source of our problems, either. >> i have a plan. i have five steps that will get this economy going. >> i'm not fighting to create democratic jobs or republican jobs, i'm trying to create american jobs. >> i will not raise taxes on middle-income americans. >> the debates will matter to some undecided voters. >> the debates could decide the election for either one of us. >> from denver, colorado, here is scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. we're about to see the one thing we haven't seen in this long campaign for the presidency-- the candidates side by side. it's the first of three debates between the democratic incumbent-- 51-year-old barack obama-- and his republican challenger 65-year-old mitt romney. it comes 34 days before the election-- though early voting is already under way in many states. the focus tonight is domestic issues, including the economy, still struggling to recover from the great recession. polls show the race is very close nationally, but in swing st
. one is make the big picture. he's the free enterpriser and president obama is the big government planner. and those are big differences in philosophy in government. two, romney has a tax cut plan. he has a spending cut plan. he has an energy plan. he's got to make it clear. he's got to explain to people the connection between his plans and the economic recovery that we have not yet had. that's a tall order for romney. and he's going to have to fight hard for it while the, of course is attacking him. >> you said earlier i was watching kudlow and company, you said the first impression is important. he's got to swing right away. you think he'll do that? >> that's my hunch. i've seen this before. aggressive. he's got to put this sort of line in the sand. here's what i believe. and here's what he believes. and there's a big choice in this election. he is the guy who wants redistribution. i'm the guy who wants growth. he's the guy who wants government centered economy. i'm the guy for free enterprise. he's got to say that. but it's doubly hard because he's got to put meat on the bones
's happened in our government in recent years and has continued up until now is a breakdown in the trust among our people and the -- >> don't adjust your set. this is what it was like live. hold on for just a second. this is what it was like for people watching the debate that night. [ silence ] >> the pool broadcaster from philadelphia have temporarily lost the audio. it is not a conspiracy against governor carter or president ford. they will fix it as soon as possible. >> the pool audio from philadelphia has been lost momentarily. we hope to have it back any minute. we don't know what's happened to it. >> it took 27 minutes to get that sound back. so the first time we had incumbent president face his challenger on tv in a debate in american history, it was totally novel to the country, it had never happened before, and the verdict to the extent that there was any clear winner or not, nobody really seemed to think there was a clear winner. frankly, it was almost beside the point. everybody was distracted with what went wrong, technically, 27 minutes of silence all blamed on this tiny little c
to be put in to a situation where you have a government determining somebody who wants to put the idea up on television can't do that. that's one of the things with the campaign finance is that it's what to nay say about democracy is the worst form of government except for the worst form of government. the campaign finance system may not look perfect. when you look at the alternative i don't know they are god either. i don't know if it's a good to have the department of justice to determine he can't run television ads. ic you should be able to do that. i think it's a first amendment right. when you move to the constitutional right it starts getting ugly. >> yeah. we don't -- even or side there's been money in elections for forever. lots of money. going back as long as with can. we can go back to george washington and the night before. there was tails of flying rum and beer and the voice rang out the day 6 election day. how to they got out of the book. there's been money and things in politics for as long as we know. i don't think either side of a necessarily thinks the money itself and ha
wants to have government investing for us. he wants to hire more government workers. he wants to raise taxes, as the vice-president biden blurted out today, they want to raise taxes by a trillion dollars, or more like $2 trillion by our calculation. he has laid out the same policies he has been following the last four years. i don't think that sells very well when people hear that. he also didn't have the chance to continue to misrepresent my views. i got the chance to present my own perspectives. and i think that helped me. >> sean: do you think to some extent that the obama campaign has overreached by calling you a tax cheat and attacking bain capital and even suggesting that you were responsible for the death of this man's wife, et cetera, et cetera, they spent millions and millions of dollars advancing a narrative against you, you know, the president himself saying that your plan is for dirty air and dirty water and you want kids with autism and the elderly to fend for themselves. to some extent do you think that by over reaching and when people saw you side by side that that partl
going to be demand to be paid, but reach the point where the foreign governments will demand exorbitant amounts to lend to us, i'm sorry to say, there's not enough to be done, we're going to have to raise taxes, and we're going to have to do it. >> why start with something that will prevent you from cutting. >> it's not going to be-- >> with all due respect, ben, the history of this country the last 20 years, or 30 years, trying to do deficit reduction is raising taxes and not doing the cutting on the other end. why don't we try a different approach? why don't we try an approach and cut stuff and then maybe raise, at thats later? >> we can't cut. we can't cut. we can't cut. >> then we're might as well as go down in flames if we can't cut. >> raise taxes. >> neil: charles, one of the interesting things this week, the 47% romney thing and i go back and forth no matter who's nose got out of joint as a result of the comments picked up at a fundraiser. the 47% should stagger you, how we get 47% don't pay taxes. i take nothing away from those on social security, retirement. for whatever reaso
and federal government. i will just briefly talk about my background and how i first got into the position as mayor. holyoke is a small city of about 40,000 people outside of springfield in the western part of massachusetts. i was born and raised there and went to the city's public schools became the first to my family to go on to college and when i got to brown studied urban studies there and like a lot of folks my age i chose to come back to my hometown and give back to the city that i thought had given me the opportunities that i had. holyoke has a very rich -- and also the first city to make paper so we are nicknamed the paper city. like a lot of cities in the northeast we were once a moving industrial city but at the same time folks came into holyoke and a lot of the factories close down, move south are moved overseas so we know have an 11% unemployment rate which is higher than the state national average and about 50% of our population is latino, puerto rican and a diversity as well. so i got elected last november. there were four of us running in the election. it was a nonpartisan r
on the government and victims and who he would never be able to reach because he would not be able to purr suede them to take responsibility for their lives. >> i'll never convince 47% of the country to take personal responsibility and care for their lives. those comments he describes his disdain for half the country, those comments have had a measurable impact on the campaign. in the new poll just released in the last couple hours, people say those remarks from mr. romney made them feel more negative than positive toward mr. romney by a 22-point margin. those results match other polling that shows those comments alienated undecided voters. regardless of what you think of the substance of that it statement from mr. romney, it did turn the whole republican pundit class against him, called every candidate in a contested race to distance themselves from the presidential nominee of their party to start campaigning against mitt romney, telling voters, listen, i don't like that guy on that issue either, but vote for me any way even though i'm a republican. whether or not you think the remarks were sca
in changing our policy in afghanistan to count terrorism. we're trying to prop up a government in afghanistan. couldn't terrorism requires far less troops and focuses at striking against al qaeda sweledl as well as any taliban insurjents we might need for the purpose of our fight. i believe that the draw down in afghanistan is well positioned. i'm actually an advocate of something that is more accelerated. i have been for quite some time and i believe we focus on couldn't terrorism which risks less lives. >> we're going to go back on the economy. you say you support a comprehensive solution to the deficit that includes revenues and cuts in spending. can you name one program you've eliminated while you've been in congress? >> yes the s 22. i voted this is something the pentagon did not want but there were those advocating for it. i voted against the s22 which was cut by the way. i voted on a different alternative fighter engine that was not necessary as well and that was cut. and those are examples of programs that were cut. but whey don't want to do is what my opponent says he embraces the ry
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 179 (some duplicates have been removed)